How to find your dream Healthcare job

Leaving University and being chucked head-long into the world of Self-Employed life can be a daunting prospect for any budding practitioner. The multitude of different employment options, from associate positions, to room-rentals or starting your own business / clinic are all options presented to you when you decide to go it alone. We've been there and done it all and can empathisise. So how do you decide what to do next. And once you've decided the path to follow, how do you find your dream job?

Leaving University and being chucked head-long into the world of Self-Employed life can be a daunting prospect for any budding practitioner. The multitude of different employment options, from associate positions, to room-rentals or starting your own business / clinic are all options presented to you when you decide to go it alone. We've been there and done it all and can empathisise. So how do you decide what to do next. And once you've decided the path to follow, how do you find your dream job?

What kind of role is right for me?

When it comes to what role you choose to pursue, there are several factors to think about. The easiest option by far is to take an associate position within an already established practice. This type of role will often come with a patient list ready to be taken over, giving you a jump-start on other options that require you to build a list yourself, from scratch.

Other positives for the Associate role is that you will often have the opportunity to learn from other, more experienced, practitioners. There will often be a clinical lead that may include a mentorship in the role, giving you the opportunity to learn the trade that is invaluable when first starting out.

The downside to this type of role, however, is that the normal profit split for a just-qualified practitioner will be either 40% or 50%. For this split you are often getting quite a bang for your buck. Marketing, bills, reception and rent costs are all covered and you may even get online bookings, regular CPD meetings and team activities included.

An alternative to an associate role is renting a room as you establish yourself as a practitioner. This can come in various guises and some are more useful than others. Obviously renting a room in an office block isn't going to bring with it many benefits, but renting a room in an established practice can bring many of the same perks as being an associate. Some rental agreements can come with integrations with other team members, space on the businesses website and even a communal marketing fund that can aid you getting your practice off the ground.

A more likely scenario, however, is that you'll need to spend some money setting up your own website, creating your own logo and


 

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What should I expect from my first job?

When it comes to what role you choose to pursue, there are several factors to think about. The easiest option by far is to take an associate position within an already established practice. This type of role will often come with a patient list ready to be taken over, giving you a jump-start on other options that require you to build a list yourself, from scratch.

Other positives for the Associate role is that you will often have the opportunity to learn from other, more experienced, practitioners. There will often be a clinical lead that may include a mentorship in the role, giving you the opportunity to learn the trade that is invaluable when first starting out.

The downside to this type of role, however, is that the normal profit split for a just-qualified practitioner will be either 40% or 50%. For this split you are often getting quite a bang for your buck. Marketing, bills, reception and rent costs are all covered and you may even get online bookings, regular CPD meetings and team activities included.

An alternative to an associate role is renting a room as you establish yourself as a practitioner. This can come in various guises and some are more useful than others. Renting a room in an established clinic can offer some of the benefits of an associate based role, with a little more freedom over working hours and days. (albeit while still paying the same rent). Renting a room in an office block will have none of these perks, however you may have much less competition nearby and thereby greater access to a pool of potential patients.


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